Corruption in Spain and Ambassador Alan Solomont

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Ambassador Alan Solomont, Spain corruption

U.S. Ambassador to Spain Alan Solomont at the Europa Press Breakfast briefing tells the Spanish government to act fast to end government corruption. (AP File Photo/Andres Kudacki)

Something is very rotten in Spain when the United States Government and through its mouthpiece in Spain, Ambassador Alan Solomont, is telling the Spanish Government to act fast and do something. Perhaps the State Department has information about the situation in Spain and its dangers that the Spanish government does not have.

According to ABC.es, United States Ambassador to Spain Alan Solomont at a Europa Press Breakfast briefing, has urged and encouraged the Spanish Executive to address the critical issue of government corruption  in a way that is “energetic, open and fast.” He also admitted that it would be good if all Spanish political parties came to an agreement to fight corruption at all levels. The credibility of the government is of great importance in our time, he said.

He also stated that Spain has nothing to be ashamed of because it has a history of success that has overcome major problems in the past “and will be able to overcome the current difficulties.”

Confidence and credibility must be maintained in the wake of the sacrifices Spaniards have been asked to make, he said.

The sound bite from this piece of news is: “The United States urges Spain to address corruption swiftly and aggressively.” Note that it is the U.S. government who is advising Spain about its affairs.

The sound bite from Lavanguardia.com is: “U.S. Rajoy urges to be ‘aggressive’ with corruption. The Ambassador to Spain, Alan Solomont, requests (my emphasis) to restrain (my emphasis again) the suspect not to undermine the confidence of citizens.” As this does not make much sense, I take it this is the eternal problem of Spaniards with foreign languages.

U.S. Ambassador Alan Solomont urges Spain to end corruption

Corruption in Spain

After enduring, suffering and putting up with Franco’s 40-year ruthless dictatorship, Spain overcame the scars of the Civil War, let bygones be bygones, and thanks to Juan Carlos I, it became a Parliamentary Democracy with a constitution that 85 percent of citizens approved in a referendum in 1978. All political parties were free to engage in politics, even the Communist Party, so loathed by the dictatorship, was allowed to play its part in turning Spain into a Democracy. The world took notice of this peaceful transition from dictatorship to democracy.

However from the very start, corruption, graft, extortion, speculation and downright theft became the order of the day. All political parties, especially the major ones, the Partido Popular and Partido Socialista, who have been alternating in power since then, instituted caciquismos, bossism, kickbacks, hand picking of appointments, direct stealing of government funds and the thoughtless squandering of taxpayers’ money.

The Partido Popular promised to end the situation and get Spain out of the economic crises, which was of their making, with the very willing help of the Partido Socialista, aiding and abetting during their eight years in office. Now the President of the Government himself, Mariano Rajoy, and top officials of the Partido Popular are under scrutiny. It seems, according to El País, they had been accepting checks under the table for years, unbeknownst to Hacienda, the Internal Revenue Service in Spain.

This situation cannot continue. Perhaps Spain should take a one-year sabbatical leave from the UN, as a country, in order to clean its corruption and economy, place a bunch of corrupt politicians in jail and show the world this is a real democracy, a serious democracy.

Something is very wrong when the United States Government and through its mouthpiece in Spain, Ambassador Alan Solomont, is telling the Spanish Government to act fast and do something. Perhaps the State Department has information about the situation in Spain and its dangers that the Spanish government does not have. Give it some thought.

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