Stephen Colbert Report parodies anti-immigrant sentiment

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Leave it to Stephen Colbert to make the point about anti-immigrant sentiment in the United States in a way that can get us to laugh about it.

“America’s ballsiest pundit,” as the Comedy Central channel where his Colbert Report is aired calls him, tackled the U.S. immigration problem on his popular TV show earlier this month — five days after President Barack Obama issued an order that granted relief from deportation to up to 800,000 young immigrants who came as children.

“Folks, I don’t have to tell you that illegal immigration is a problem in this country, because I can pay a Mexican to tell you for me,” Colbert starts.

The 3 1/2-minute report, which was viewed at least 34,300 times as of Tuesday afternoon, followed a PEW Hispanic Center research study that shows that Asians surpassed Latinos as the fastest growing ethnic group in the United States.

Related News: Asians surpass Hispanics as fastest-growing immigrant group, study says

“Yes, Asians are the new Mexicans. Our nacho nemesis has morphed into a Ramen rival,”  Colbert said in his classic dry sarcastic style. “This Inv-Asian is due to an increased demand for highly skilled workers with many recruited by U.S. companies.

“Nation, we’re getting boxed in,” he added, referring to his fans, known as The Colbert Nation. “Mexicans do the jobs we don’t want to do and Asians do the jobs we’re not able to do.”

He ends the piece suggesting that, rather than a wall or electrified fence, the U.S. needs a “full steel barrier across the floor” so Asians “directly below us on the planet” cannot dig their way through.

“And, we should electrify it.

“Of course, that means we’ll all have to wear rubber shoes. Wow. That’s a lot of shoes,” he says, and pretends to stop to think about it.

“Wait a minute. What am I saying? We’ll get them from China.”

 

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